Mindfulness Stress Reduction Course

Mindfulness Course

Mindfulness training teaches us about paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, non-judgmentally, in the present moment (Kabat-Zinn). The present is central to our lives as we can neither predict the future nor change the past. Mindfulness helps us learn to open our senses, so we can stop living on ‘auto-pilot’ and start fully experiencing the richness of life as each moment unfolds.

Benefits of Class:

Stress |Depression | Anxiety | Panic | Fatigue | Fibromyalgia | Asthma | Heart disease | High BP | Sleep disturbances | Skin disorders| Chronic pain

COURSE EXPECTATIONS

Mindfulness training helps us develop deeper awareness, peace, and clarity through:

  • Guided instruction in mindfulness meditation practices
  • Guided instruction in gentle Hatha yoga and breathing exercises
  • Exploration of the connection of mind-body-thoughts and sensations
  • Group dialogues and mindful communication
  • Daily home assignments

This course involves active participation both in the classroom and at home as you learn and develop mindfulness practices in your daily life.

Price Details

**FREE INTRO SESSION SEPT 29th

Asas Studio 9 – 11 am 

8 WEEK COURSE

ASAS STUDIO

FRIDAYS 9:00 – 11:30 AM

STARTS OCTOBER 6th 

 Al WAAB LADIES ONLY

TUESDAYS 9:00 – 11:30 AM

STARTS OCTOBER 3rd

 DAY OF SILENCE NOVEMBER 24th

 QR1800, EB QR1550

(if paid for by 25/9)

10% discount for groups of 5 or more 

Program Lead by

Jacki Woodworth

Senior Mindfulness Teacher

BACKGROUND

BACKGROUND

Jon Kabat-Zinn began teaching Mindfulness workshops at the University of Massachusetts Medical School over 30 years ago. Since then, more than 20,000 people have completed the program there and thousands more worldwide.

“Strictly speaking, Mindfulness is not a technique or method, although there are many different methods and techniques for its cultivation. Rather, it is more aptly described as a way of being or a way of seeing, one that involves “coming to our senses” in every meaning of the phrase. It certainly implies developing and refining a way of becoming more intimate with one’s own experience through systematic self-observation. This includes intentionally suspending the impulse to characterize, evaluate, and judge what one is experiencing.”

(Jon Kabat-Zinn, in Foreword Segal, Williams, Teasdale: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Depression, 2002).

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